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Posts Tagged ‘US Consulate Ho Chi Minh City’

23rd November 2017

The following is a transcript of the video which can be found here: K-1 Visas from Vietnam

In this video we are going to be discussing K-1 Visas specifically in the context of cases that will be processed presumably through the US Consulate in Ho Chi Minh City primarily.

As can be heard from the preamble to this video, I’m an American attorney but we’re located here in Bangkok. Primarily we do the vast majority of our cases do involve Thai nationals though we do deal with cases regionally and I sort of thought about it the other day and I said that you know, I really don’t do enough videos talking about some of the other posts and other nationalities we deal with in the immigration context within the immigration practice here. So I went ahead and decided to do this video.

The way to look at the K-1 process specifically and the K-1 fiancée process is slightly different than dealing with other family based petitions. First of all, you have to be intending to marry an American citizen unlike marriage visas where you can be married to a lawful permanent resident and process a case that way for one of the preference categories. K-1 Visas are only between a foreign national and an American citizen. Both parties have to be legally free to marry, that’s rather important. This can come up and cause some confusion, and cause some problems in a lot cases because folks think “oh, we filed and now we can marry”. “No, you have to remain fiancées throughout the whole process!”  You have to be legally free to marry up until the fiancée, the Vietnamese fiancée comes to the United States at which point it is then possible to go ahead and get married in the United States and file for adjustment of status to lawful permanent residence. In another video on this channel I discuss specifically adjustment of status. Adjustment of status is the process by which an individual comes to the United States, in this case in K-1 status, gets married and goes ahead and  lawful permanent residence attached,  aka Green Card Status. Another thing to keep in mind with respect to the K-1 specifically, the couple in question needs to have met physically in person within 2 years of the filing of the petition for the visa benefits.  There are exceptions to this rule but they are very, very narrow in scope and for that reason it’s best to effectively just go ahead and say “look, I have to meet in person. That usually means they are going to have to travel at least once to, in the case of a Vietnamese fiancée, presumably Vietnam and meet physically in person, the Vietnamese fiancée before filing can be perfected or at least before an acceptable filing can be perfected.

Some things to think about as far as how it works.  Well the case starts off over at the Department of Homeland Security, specifically USCIS, United States Citizenship and Immigration Services. They go ahead and process the petition. If the petition is approved, the case moves to the National Visa Center which is under the auspices of the Department of State. The National Visa Center, they act as a sort of clearing house or sort of administrative hub for sending these cases out, making sure it gets from the approval at DHS and gets to the appropriate embassy or consulate. In the vast majority of cases involving Vietnam you’re  not going to be dealing with the post in Hanoi, in the vast majority of cases at least that we deal with, you’re dealing with the consulate in Ho Chi Minh City. It is a higher volume post, so processing can take a little bit longer. In Vietnam, as far as Consular processing goes, it can take a little bit longer when compared to other posts in the region, Bangkok included, but Bangkok is a pretty high volume post as well. Some of the other smaller posts, Cambodia, Laos definitely, even Yangon, don’t quite have the volume so things may move a little bit more quickly.  But that being said, it’s just the process you have to deal with and every case is sort of being unique and you have to deal with the circumstances as you take them.  So that being said, it will go to the Consulate in Ho Chi Minh City and at that point the case, the Vietnamese fiancée will be informed of the protocols that he or she needs to undertake to go ahead and complete the consular processing portion. In the cases where we have been retained to assist in these matters, we often assist with translations, compilation of documentation, filling out of various forms, both online and physical forms cases and in a lot of cases going ahead and submitting the request for the actual visa application interview.  And then on top of that we go ahead and assist in preparing certain questions or I really hate to say we provide the questions that they are going to ask, we don’t; we provide an overview with respect to how, what is the process looking for? What kind of due diligence is the Consular Officer likely to be interested in conducting? In most cases it’s ascertaining that the couple is a genuine couple, they are legally free to marry, they’ve remained legally free to marry, they adhere to the law, they adhere to the Immigration policy, they don’t have any legal grounds of inadmissibility and all the documentation relevant to the case that that officer feels is pertinent is present and accounted for with respect to the underlying application. That’s basically what they’re looking to do. It’s not an exercise in “stump the applicant”, it’s an exercise in due diligence. They want to make certain that the couple is bona fide.  So for that reason, that is sort of a general overview of what the interview process is like. If the officer requests further documentation, they can issue what is called a 221-G request for further documentation.

In some cases they may feel that the case is denied for various reasons. They have to give a legal reason why they are denying the case. In most cases that I have dealt when you get a denial, you are looking at a legal ground of inadmissibility, and a legal ground of inadmissibility is defined in the Immigration Nationality Act and in some cases it’s often possible to overcome that legal ground of inadmissibility through use of an I-601 waiver. There are various videos on this channel with respect to the I-601 specifically but to sort of just sum up K-1 visa processing through Vietnam, you’re looking at a matter of months; I think you are looking at probably 8 or 9 months with respect to the overall “door to door” process with respect to processing a successful K-1 visa, on average.  There are outliers on both sides. Every case is unique; it’s like a snow flake. But that being said, that’s kind of a general overview with respect to timeline, the thing to keep in mind, just sort of in sum. It’s a 3 part process. It effectively begins in the US, goes through various offices in the US, finally to wind up, generally speaking, at the US Consulate in Ho Chi Minh City where the matter will be adjudicated by the Consular Officer at the Immigrant Visa Unit. Again, K-1s are interesting because they’re a non-immigrant visa that has dual intent. You are actually a non-immigrant visa but to all intents and purposes, the consular section treats it as if it were an immigrant visa and you go ahead and undertake the interview and hopefully, presuming a successful interview, a visa will be issued shortly after the interview date.

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20th January 2010

Virtually every United States Embassy or Consulate will close in recognition of United States Federal Holidays. Most will also close in recognition of local holidays or customs. The United States Embassy in Vietnam is no different. Below, please find the 2010 holiday closing schedule for the US Embassy located in Hanoi:

Holiday Date Day Type
New Year’s Day Jan 1 Friday A&V
Martin Luther King’s Birthday Jan 18 Monday A
Lunar New Year Festival Feb 15-18 Mon-Thur V
President’s Day Feb 15 Monday A
Anniversary of Hung Kings April 23 Friday V
Victory Day April 30 Friday V
International Labor Day(observed) May 3 Monday V
Memorial Day May 31 Monday A
Independence Day Jul 5 Monday A
Vietnamese National Day Sep 2 Thursday V
Labor Day Sep 6 Monday A
Columbus Day Oct 11 Monday A
Veterans Day Nov 11 Thursday A
Thanksgiving Day Nov 25 Thursday A
Christmas Day Dec 24 Friday A
2011 New Year’s day (observed) Dec 31 Friday A

The above notation of “A” and “V” denotes the type of holiday. “A” stands for American, while “V” stands for Vietnamese.

In Vietnam, the bulk of United States visa and immigration matters are handled at the US Consulate in Ho Chi Minh City. This situation is the opposite of the internal mechanics of the posts in Thailand as the US Embassy in Bangkok handles nearly all Immigrant visa petitions while the US Consulate in Chiang Mai deals with Non-Immigrant visa applications for visas such as the US Tourist Visa, the J1 visa, and the F1 visa.  That being said, the holiday closing schedule of the US Consulate in Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC) is identical to the schedule of the US Embassy in Hanoi. Therefore, those interested in that post’s closing schedule should look to the information above.

For those in a legitimate emergency, it may be possible to contact the Embassy during a holiday. That being said, this is contacting Embassy staff may be difficult as most Embassy and Consulate personnel use holidays to take much needed time off. Therefore, those with an impending issue would be wise to take care of it before a holiday as it is unlikely that the Embassy will make special accommodations.

For those who need passports, notary services, Consular Reports of Birth Abroad, or visa pages it would be wise to contact the American Citizen Services Section of the local US Embassy or US Consulate.

For those interested in learning more about the US Embassy in Hanoi please click here. For those who wish to learn maore about the US Consulate in HCMC please click here. Finally, for those interested in US visas from Southeast Asia please see K-1 visa, CR-1 visa, or K-3 visa.

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