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Posts Tagged ‘Thai visa exemption’

3rd January 2017

It recently came to this blogger’s attention that the officials of the Royal Thai Immigration Police have made policy changes regarding passport holders of certain countries. It appears that passport holders from 37 different countries will now be able to obtain a 30 day visa exemption stamp by crossing a land border into Thailand. The recently announced list includes the following countries:

Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bahrain, Brunei, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Ireland, Israel, Kuwait, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Oman, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, South Africa, Sweden, Switzerland, and Turkey

It should be noted that most holders of passports on the above list were already eligible to receive 30 day exemption stamps when arriving at one of Thailand’s many international airports. However, 30 day exemption stamps were apparently not available when arriving at land borders. While this liberalization is likely welcome news to prospective tourists who wish to travel to countries surrounding Thailand it should be be analyzed in conjunction with recent announcements regarding so-called border runs.

As previously noted on this blog and other sites, Thai border runs are effectively a thing of the past as recent laws have been enacted which bar individuals from making border runs more than 2 times per calendar year. Although this new rule is unlikely to impact genuine tourists in Thailand, those who have used ostensibly temporary visas and visa exemption stamps to live in Thailand are likely to find maintaining their status in this way to be very difficult in the future. This news comes at the same time as a number of foreign owned or managed businesses in Thailand are reporting significant increases in immigration inspections as well as well known hostels are being raided by those seeking not only criminals, but over-stayers in particular. How this will all play out in 2017 remains to be seen, but one thing is certain: staying long term in Thailand is becoming increasingly difficult, expensive, and time consuming.

Meanwhile, as Thai Immigration cracks down, it appears that the Department of Homeland Security’s United States Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) has made new regulations regarding the forms which must be submitted in connection with petitions for various immigration benefits. Forms such as the I-130 (associated with spousal immigration petitions for visas such as the CR-1 or the IR-1) have been upgraded and apparently the USCIS will no longer accept forms of an older pedigree. The same is apparently true with respect to the I-129f (the form associated with the K-1 visa used to bring fiancees of American Citizens to the USA) as that form has been updated.

Concurrently, it appears that there has been an across-the-board increase in the fees associated with the filing of certain immigration petitions. It is advised that those interested in this matter either speak with a qualified professional or conduct their own research to ascertain the current costs and fees associated with a visa to the USA.

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19th August 2016

It appears that the fees for those who seek visas on arrival in Thailand are set to double beginning in September 2016. A full article regarding this issue can be read by clicking here.

It should be noted that this fee increase only pertains to those countries which require visas on arrival as opposed to Thai visa exemption stamps. Meanwhile it appears the the current fee structure for other Thai visa categories (such as the Thai business visa, retirement visa, marriage visa, and education visa) is to remain the same. However, it should be noted that as of the time of this writing, the practice of so-called “visa-runs” has effectively been eradicated as Thai immigration officials are no longer allowing multiple visa exemptions and/or tourist visas for the same individual in perpetuity.

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21st July 2014

In recent weeks, sweeping new changes have been announced regarding Thai visa exemptions and so-called visa runs. As has been previously noted on this blog, as of August 12, 2014 those using the in/out method to obtain 30 day visa exemption status will no longer be permitted to do so. However, in the weeks leading up to this clampdown anecdotal evidence has been noted which shows that those currently seeking to enter the country this way have been denied entry. Meanwhile, further information has come to light which shows that some have been stopped at the Thai border attempting to enter on Thai 60 day tourist visas, many such individuals have apparently been turned away.

It further came to light that Thai immigration authorities will be imposing a blacklisting scheme to bar those who have overstayed in the country from reentering for certain designated periods of time. What this system will ultimately look like remains to be seen as it was recently rumored that officials are re-looking at the plan in an effort to ensure that consequences are not excessively harsh. However, it would appear that long term overstayers and visa runners could see themselves turned away at the border in the future and possibly banned from returning for an extended period depending upon their situation.

A bright note was reported this week, as officials have apparently announced that visa exemption extensions may be granted in the future for 30 days as opposed to a mere 7.  Apparently, immigration officials are looking into allowing 30 day extensions for those in Thailand on a 30 day exemption stamp. Obviously, the decision to grant a 30 day extension will be made on a case by case basis and at this time it seems that the proposed plan would require the foreign tourist to pay 1900 baht when seeking a visa extension.

All of these developments mean that in the future those wishing to remain in the Kingdom of Thailand for a prolonged period of time are well advised to obtain a long term Thai visa in a category in which they qualify. For example, those coming to Thailand to work or start a company are well advised to seek a Thai business visa as well as a Thai work permit. Meanwhile, those wishing to study in Thailand may do so, so long as they obtain a Thai education visa from a school duly accredited by the Thai Ministry of Education. Retirees may remain in the Kingdom on a Thai retirement visa so long as they have the requisite funds or pension. Concurrently, those with family in Thailand could apply for a Thai O visa so long as they meet the necessary financial requirements.

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